Succinct Scares: Seven Short Reads for Horror Fans

Below, I’ve listed several recent favourites that will give your wrists and spine a break from the weighty tomes The King is known for. These suggestions are short reads, but still have all the terror a horror fan could possibly crave. Several of them come from the indie publishing scene. Like cinema, some of the best fiction is lost in a deluge of superstar saturation, so I wanted to shine a light into those unknown corners. Continue reading Succinct Scares: Seven Short Reads for Horror Fans

Annie Hall – More Than Just A Romantic Comedy

By Chris Gallagher In 1978, Annie Hall won best picture at the 50th academy awards ceremony in Los Angeles. It beat the likes of Star Wars (1977), Julia (1977), The Turning Point (1977) and The Goodbye Girl (1977). As well as best picture, Woody Allen took home best director, Diane Keaton won best actress and Allen and Marshall Brickman took home the Oscar for best … Continue reading Annie Hall – More Than Just A Romantic Comedy

They Shall Not Grow Old – A Human Depiction of War

By Dan McGowan For me, the worry is that a film like They Shall Not Grow Old will descend into nostalgic ‘our boys’ propaganda, without decrying the horrors of warfare. Released on the centenary of the First World War – and screened by BBC2 on Armistice Day itself – I must admit that I approached the film with expectant vigilance. Instead, Peter Jackson’s restoration of … Continue reading They Shall Not Grow Old – A Human Depiction of War

Widows (2018) – An Affecting and Exhilarating Experience

By John Murphy This was the first thing that struck me when watching Widows – the new film from Steve McQueen, and the first since his Oscar-winning 12 Years A Slave. I think we can agree that these are manifestly different films, but from the first frame it possessed that same visceral realism of his earlier work. I felt the heat from an exploding truck; … Continue reading Widows (2018) – An Affecting and Exhilarating Experience

Lady Bird: A Tale of Working Class Guilt

By Graeme McKay Vladimir Nabokov told us that good readers shouldn’t look to emotionally identify with the protagonist of a story, and for the most part I managed to avoid falling into that trap while watching Lady Bird. Most of the film didn’t engage me very much, but the working class guilt was like a gut punch: a sometimes overplayed, but always interesting thread that … Continue reading Lady Bird: A Tale of Working Class Guilt

Halloween (2018) – A Film About Trauma

By Chris Gallagher As Michael Myers walks past a crying baby, kitchen knife in hand, briefly looking into its cradle, a wry smile crosses my face. The Halloween reboot has made Michael Myers a genuine force of nature once again. As he saunters through Haddonfield, randomly and brutally murdering, it’s clear that this is the Michael Myers of the original film and not the subsequent … Continue reading Halloween (2018) – A Film About Trauma