They Shall Not Grow Old – A Human Depiction of War

By Dan McGowan For me, the worry is that a film like They Shall Not Grow Old will descend into nostalgic ‘our boys’ propaganda, without decrying the horrors of warfare. Released on the centenary of the First World War – and screened by BBC2 on Armistice Day itself – I must admit that I approached the film with expectant vigilance. Instead, Peter Jackson’s restoration of … Continue reading They Shall Not Grow Old – A Human Depiction of War

Widows (2018) – An Affecting and Exhilarating Experience

By John Murphy This was the first thing that struck me when watching Widows – the new film from Steve McQueen, and the first since his Oscar-winning 12 Years A Slave. I think we can agree that these are manifestly different films, but from the first frame it possessed that same visceral realism of his earlier work. I felt the heat from an exploding truck; … Continue reading Widows (2018) – An Affecting and Exhilarating Experience

Lady Bird: A Tale of Working Class Guilt

By Graeme McKay Vladimir Nabokov told us that good readers shouldn’t look to emotionally identify with the protagonist of a story, and for the most part I managed to avoid falling into that trap while watching Lady Bird. Most of the film didn’t engage me very much, but the working class guilt was like a gut punch: a sometimes overplayed, but always interesting thread that … Continue reading Lady Bird: A Tale of Working Class Guilt

Social Realism and the ‘British New Wave’

By Chris Gallagher Social realism is one of the defining characteristics of British Cinema but what is it and how do we define it? A focus on the everyday gives the audience an experience in the authentic and shows the world and society for what it truly is. It’s a gritty representation of the world using techniques developed by the early British documentary movement. A … Continue reading Social Realism and the ‘British New Wave’

The Cinema of Wong Kar-Wai

By Chris Gallagher Wong Kar-Wai is a visionary in the world of film. A filmmaker that continues to question boundaries of style and narrative, his films are a visceral experience with each frame filled with colour and texture. Wong Kar-Wai is one of a few Chinese directors that have received International acclaim but whereas John Woo is known for his high-octane action films, Wong falls … Continue reading The Cinema of Wong Kar-Wai

The Hollywood Renaissance – MASH

By Chris Gallagher I’ve always been a fan of American cinema. It’s kind of hard to escape the clutches of the Hollywood machine. The capitalist juggernaut that cynically uses film as a commodity to make money. From Transformers to whatever turd of a film Adam Sandler is making, Hollywood sucks the art out of film to make an hour-long product placement, targeting kids like the … Continue reading The Hollywood Renaissance – MASH

A Woman’s Role in Contemporary Hollywood

By Chris Gallagher Hollywood cinema has continually portrayed masculinity as dominant, with women being relegated to the role of spectacle. The male gaze has cast a shadow over women in Hollywood, a shadow that continues to this day. How has the role of women changed in Hollywood and how have they been represented in recent times? Women in a Time of Greed The 1980s saw … Continue reading A Woman’s Role in Contemporary Hollywood

Salad Days – An Interview With Director Scott Crawford

By Chris Gallagher Independent Filmmaker Scott Crawford is the man behind one of the most interesting documentaries of 2014, SALAD DAYS: A DECADE OF PUNK IN WASHINGTON, DC (1980-90). Salad Days is a film that examines the early DIY punk scene in Washington DC, exploring the musical and cultural legacy that it forged. A host of interesting contributors allows the audience to get a full … Continue reading Salad Days – An Interview With Director Scott Crawford

Five Lost Italian Movie Soundtracks

The 70’s and 80’s were the golden era of Italian exploitation cinema. From the stylish gialli of Sergio Martino and Dario Argento to the infamously brutal cannibal films of Ruggero Deodato and splatter of Lucio Fulci, Italy was a hotbed for innovative, low budget and often extreme cinema.  The same can be said for the soundtracks that accompanied these films as Italy produced some of … Continue reading Five Lost Italian Movie Soundtracks

Time Lapse – An Interview With Director Bradley King

By Chris Gallagher Writer/Director Bradley King is the man behind one of the most interesting Sci Fi movies of 2014, TIME LAPSE. Bradley self-funded, wrote and directed Time Lapse, which was his first foray into the world of feature film. It was co-written with writer/producer B.P. Cooper and it went on to play in 75 film festivals around the world. In what is a truly unique take … Continue reading Time Lapse – An Interview With Director Bradley King